Statistics may show significant decline in the number workplace injuries, but the number of workplace fatalities rate have slightly increased over the years with transportation-related jobs continuing to be the riskiest profession, reports Times Record. Although there is slight increase in the rate of workplace fatalities on transportation-related jobs, comprehensive analysis – taking all the professions into account – shows that there is over all decline in the national rate of workplace fatalities. Some jobs are considered safe, while some other jobs remain incredibly dangerous.

Business Insider reports that according to the latest data from Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), a total of 4,585 fatal work injuries were recorded in the US in 2013 – the second-lowest number recorded since the BLS began collecting this data in 1992. Also, using data from the BLS, Business Insider has created an infographic that shows the 10 deadliest jobs in the US, based on the annual number of deaths per 100,000 full-time workers.

While construction laborers have the least fatality rate (18.1 percent) among the top ten, logging remains to be the most dangerous job in the United States with fatality rate of 91.3 percent. See the infographic below.

List of the 10 deadliest jobs in the US, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)

Featured Image via Flickr

One thought on “Infographic: The 10 Deadliest Jobs In The US

  1. I always fear that I would, in one point in life, past a construction site and see someone fall or get injured by equipment. Just passing a site is scary enough with its sounds and equipment. I knew someone who got his arm cut by a buzzsaw. And of course there’s news of people getting fingers severed by chainsaws.

    While we put so much pride into making cars safer and solid, apparently we can’t do the same for flight?

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