Physics

Carbon Nanotube-Based Computing Breakthrough

The future of computing is right here. Engineers at Stanford has made a quantum leap in the world of computing by building a first-ever working computer using carbon nanotubes[CNTs] semiconductor.

The future of computing is right here. Engineers at Stanford have made a quantum leap in the world of computing by building a first-ever working computer using carbon nanotubes [CNTs] semiconductor.

This breakthrough was first published in this week’s edition of Nature. The research was led by professors Subhasish and H.S. Philip Wong which they worked under the code name “CEDRIC” – that loosely stands for carbon nanotube digital integrated circuit.

This wafer contains tiny computers using carbon nanotubes, a material that could lead to smaller, more energy-efficient processors. | Credit: Stanford University
This wafer contains tiny computers using carbon nanotubes, a material that could lead to smaller, more energy-efficient processors. | Credit: Stanford University

Carbon nanotubes are best known for their electrical properties and thermal conductivity. Hence, they believe any Carbon nanotube-based computer or any other electrical appliance will deliver more power, speed and more energy efficient than those delivered by silicon-based electrical appliances.

“People have been talking about a new era of carbon nanotube electronics moving beyond silicon,” said Mitra, an electrical engineer and computer scientist. “But there have been few demonstrations of complete digital systems using this exciting technology. Here is the proof.”

The future of CNTs-based computing is not yet perfected and it’s still not capable to work and compute like our regular PC, but to be sure, it will hit the perfection immaculately. They also said there had been an issue regarding misalignment of tubes that caused error in connection and system short-circuit. This issue was resolved later on by developing an algorithm that can detect and turned off misaligned CNTs.

Jan Rabaey, professor at the University of California-Berkeley said, “Carbon nanotubes [CNTs] have long been considered as a potential successor to the silicon transistor.”

[Source: Standford]

5 comments

  1. I miss the LIKE button on blogs that don’t have them. They make it easy to let people know where I was since I don’t have time to comment on every single post I read. Nonetheless, you can see how far back I went into your blog today.

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