Health And Medicine

Frequent Argument Increases The Risk Of Premature Death

Do you argue often? Chances are that you are likely to die young. Quibbles and squabbles do not merely make one angry, they take away one's glee and peace of mind, too and apparently leave him/her feeling exasperated and worried all the time.

Frequent Argument Increases The Risk Of Premature Death

Do you argue often? Chances are that you are likely to die young. Quibbles and squabbles do not merely make one angry, they take away one’s glee and peace of mind, too and apparently leave him/her feeling exasperated and worried all the time.

According to a study released by Danish researchers, contentious men and women are 2–3 times likely to die young.

For the research, they examined 9875 men and women whose ages were between 36-52 to study the impact of stressful social relations. Participants were asked about their relationship with their partners, children, friends, neighbours, relatives and the reasons that made them unhappy.

When they examined data from 2000 till the end of 2011, from Danish Cause of Death Registry – 196 women (4%) and 226 men(6%) were reported dead at that time frame, nearly half of which were from cancer. Heart disease and stroke, liver disease, accidents and suicide accounted for the rest. 10% reported that their children put them in stress with excess demands and worries. 9% were aggravated by their spouse. 6% were constrained with demands from relatives and 2 percent had issues with friends.

After taking all these reports into account, the team came to the conclusion that frequent worries or demands from partner or children were associated with 50-100% increased risk of death from any cause. The researchers also suspect greater stress from demands/conflicts/concerns could increase the mortality risk, too and the risk could increase to a higher extend if there’s conflict at home coupled with unemployment – which increases the rate of premature death.

14 comments

  1. Maybe the folks should think before they speak and then there wouldn’t be so many arguments and isn’t it true that making-up after arguing is good for your health too??

  2. It makes sense that frequent arguing increases the chances of early death; excessive stress is not our friend. However, I was a little surprised by the findings–a professor in one of my grad school classes umpteen years ago said that nursing home residents who are “sweethearts” tend to pass away sooner than those who rail against their fate. Of course, the situations are apples and oranges and what my teacher said was only anecdotal, but I always associated argumentative people with being “too crabby to die.”

  3. enjoyed this post much! and whew, another reason to lighten up and chill out a bit, eh? and cool to see how it helps with longevity – 🙂 thx.

    1. Thanks! Fight shouldn’t exist. 🙂

      Well, I hope you noticed I missed a word “take” in ” they away one’s glee and peace of mind..” which I have put now.

  4. WOW! 50-100% increase in risk of death is quite high. I was expecting more like 20% or less. Stress impacts our health in so many ways. It’s amazing how learning to relax & communicate like civil adults can not only save your marriage, but your job, relationships with your children, not to mention….uh….add some years to your life span.

    1. Yeah, data makes a big difference, but it doesn’t guarantee how true the analysis is in real-life, for example – people say smoking kills and shortens one’s lifespan, but there are still active smokers who live even beyond 100; they are exceptional.

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