Space

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Shrunk Its Size To Smallest Ever Recorded

The Great Red Spot is a high pressure anti-cyclonic storm that's similar to Earth's hurricane. It was so enormous (25,500 miles wide) back in the late 1800s - the size big enough to fit three Earths within its boundaries.
Jupiter's Great Red Spot Shrunk Its Size To Smallest Ever Recorded
Images of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope over a span of 20 years, shows how the planet’s trademark spot has decreased in size over the years | Credit: NASA/ESA

The trademark of Jupiter, the Great Red Spot, has shrunk its size from how big it used to be. NASA says it’s the smallest it has been since astronomers started tracking it through their journey for more than a century ago.

Amy Simon of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland says, “Recent NASA Hubble Space Telescope observations confirm the Great Red Spot now is approximately 10,250 miles across. Astronomers have followed this downsizing since the 1930s.”

The Great Red Spot is a high pressure anti-cyclonic storm that’s similar to Earth’s hurricane. It was so enormous (25,500 miles wide) back in the late 1800s – the size big enough to fit three Earths within its boundaries. But in 1979, when NASA’s Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flew by, the spot was estimated to be only 14,500 miles across, and it was further downsized to 13,020 miles across when Hubble took a picture of it in 1995. Another photo taken in 2009 confirmed that it was measured at 11,130 miles wide.

In 2012, the downsizing accelerated at the rate of 580 miles each year, resulting in change of its shape from an oval to a circle.

According to their observations, small eddies feeding into the storm may be responsible for the accelerated change by altering the internal dynamics and energy of the Great Red Spot. However, the actual source of shrinkage is not known.

23 comments

  1. Pingback: The Beginning of The End of Jupiter? | Phoenix the Dreamer
    1. Yeah, he said he left a note to them to review my site in a month. I removed the article ’cause they didn’t like it and it almost got me permanently banned from the program. Also, they said I would get my April revenue, but I don’t know about May, their ads were on my site for 15 days.

    1. Of course we should. The planet is changing its face.

      Well, I removed the article ’cause it almost resulted in permanent banned from the program. They said I would get my April revenue, but I don’t know about May, their ads were on my site for 15 days. Hopefully, ads maybe reinstated within a month. Thanks for the help!

      1. In my experience, WordPress WILL NOT ACCEPT intervention from anyone else, and is quite rude to other people if they attempt to help someone.
        But you sorted it yourself anyway, and that must be gratifying.

      2. Thanks, if you think you helped me. Oh, just noticed you once told me this on February 3, 2014 – “No Likes and no Comments? Does this mean you’ve decided that scientific content is too rareified? 😉 Likes and Comments are NECESSARY to visiting bloggers, even if they aren’t to a blogmeister. We out here aren’t just readers, you know: we want to participate (you poor bastard)! [grin].”

        Sorry, had to bring out! Smiles 🙂

      3. No, I didn’t think I helped you at all. I’ve now given up entirely any even faint attempt to help anyone with WP disputes: I get only rudeness in reply, as I said.
        That must’ve been ages ago, that comment … and it was probably due to WP going haywire, technically, eh ?

      1. I tried to reply yesterday on my blog but it wouldn’t send. Wondered if WordPress was blocking. I was trying to offer support. Is downsizing good? I can cope with a downsized Sparkonit. Wouldn’t want to manage without you altogether. Good wishes.

      2. The post caught advertisers attention and I almost got permanently banned, so I removed it. Now, James told me he would ask the advertisers to review my site again. Hopefully, they will reinstate the ads in a month. Thank you for your help, Simon. You may delete the reblog, too.

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