Plants And Animals

DNA Analysis Suggests Loch Ness Monster Might Just Be A Giant Eel

The sheer volume of eel DNA picked up from every location sampled suggests Loch Ness monster could be a giant eel. Also, the most famous photo of Nessie was later revealed to be a fake: it was a picture of a toy submarine with a fake dinosaur head.

The monster that is said to dwell in the famous Scottish lake and to have been a common sight on the shorelines of the loch could be a giant eel, according to scientists who performed large study of environmental DNA samples of water taken from various depths across Loch Ness.  

There were also no indication that the lake is home to creatures previous deemed as possibilities, such as the prehistoric plesiosaur, sturgeon, catfish and the Greenland shark. Instead, they picked up significant amount of eel DNA from almost every location sampled.

DNA findings suggest Nessie might be a giant eel. [Image: University of Otago]

While the data can’t say much about the size of the creature, the sheer volume of DNA says that the possibility that there may be giant eels in Loch Ness can’t be disregarded.

The purpose of the study was not to find Nessie, researchers say, but to gain better insight on various life forms that the loch is home to.

Also, the most famous photo of Nessie had turned out to be a toy submarine with a fake dinosaur head. It was taken in 1934, by British surgeon, Colonel Robert Wilson.

7 comments

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        (JARRING CHORD)

      2. Graham Chapman: Trouble at mill.

        Carol Cleveland: Oh no – what sort of trouble?

        Chapman: One on’t cross beams gone owt askew on treddle.

        Cleveland: Pardon?

        Chapman: One on’t cross beams gone owt askew on treddle.

        Cleveland: I don’t understand what you’re saying.

        Chapman: (slightly irritatedly and with exaggeratedly clear accent) One of the cross beams has gone out askew on the treddle.

        Cleveland: Well what on earth does that mean?

        Chapman: *I* don’t know – Mr Wentworth just told me to come in here and say that there was trouble at the mill, that’s all – I didn’t expect a kind of Spanish Inquisition.

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      3. “The Spanish Inquisition” is a series of sketches in Monty Python’s Flying Circus, Series 2 Episode 2, first broadcast 22 September 1970, parodying the real-life Spanish Inquisition. This episode is itself entitled “The Spanish Inquisition”. The sketches are notable for their principal catchphrase, “Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!”

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